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maxxiedemon:

It was at first a bit of shocker to see that my own country descended into such chaos. Most of the time, these things are a far away news even with 2011’s London Riot. However, this is the very first time I’ve actually seen this happen right in my backyward — so to speak.

These pictures are taken by me two hours ago. The police have agreed to leave for now and the protesters have sat in for the long haul.

Just look at the numbers. And then look at how organized they are.

I have very, very little comments about the actual protests itself, but I am superbly proud about how organized and peaceful the protest have been. There are supplies tent including water, pocari sweat, food, and cooling pads (wow), and first aid stations in order to aid the protesters in need.

The protesters have also barricaded pathways for people to leave and also to enter the protest without much of a fuss and kept most major walkpaths cleared despite of the number of people.

On top of that, there are also groups of volunteers that are very slowly working through the crowd to make sure everyone there are hydrated and cooled with cooling pads in this terribly humid and hot weather.

All in all, I have never been prouder to be a Hong Kong-er. Go guys! Fight for Democracy!!

PS: If you are confused about the situation in HK, feel free to send me an ask or two for some clarification. I totally don’t mind shedding some light to the background of this riot

zkarl:

[…]And on Sept. 29, in front of Hong Kong government headquarters, a remarkable scene took place. A young protester standing near a riot policeman was attacked, apparently unprovoked, with a bolt of pepper spray across the face and in the eyes. He screamed out “We are unarmed, how can you attack us like that?”
Behind the helmet and face mask, the policeman’s expression could not be seen, but he seemed moved and said “I know, I know.” He beckoned the man over, turned around and retrieved his own water bottle, and proceeded to wash out the man’s stinging eyes. Hong Kong Policemen Apologize
"The police officers that have been called upon to be Hong Kong’s shock troops—firing and tossing tear gas canisters into crowds of protesting students, and soaking them with pepper spray—have come forward recently to express their frustration and regret.
Tens of thousands of students continue to ambulate through Hong Kong’s central business district each night, as police attempt to contain and repel them. The students are protesting recent moves by Beijing to limit Hong Kong’s ability to hold independent elections.
“Once, I felt I was the luckiest person in the world, because I could fulfill two of my childhood dreams at the same time,” wrote Arnold Wai, a member of Hong Kong’s auxiliary police force, on Facebook, on the evening of Sept. 28. “Before, I was very proud when I personally brought criminals to justice,” he said.
“However, I just phoned my superior tonight, quitting this job. I don’t want to be a political tool for someone,” he wrote, in a post on Facebook that was widely shared among Hong Kong Internet users. 
[…]

zkarl:

[…]And on Sept. 29, in front of Hong Kong government headquarters, a remarkable scene took place. A young protester standing near a riot policeman was attacked, apparently unprovoked, with a bolt of pepper spray across the face and in the eyes. He screamed out “We are unarmed, how can you attack us like that?”

Behind the helmet and face mask, the policeman’s expression could not be seen, but he seemed moved and said “I know, I know.” He beckoned the man over, turned around and retrieved his own water bottle, and proceeded to wash out the man’s stinging eyes. 

Hong Kong Policemen Apologize

"The police officers that have been called upon to be Hong Kong’s shock troops—firing and tossing tear gas canisters into crowds of protesting students, and soaking them with pepper spray—have come forward recently to express their frustration and regret.

Tens of thousands of students continue to ambulate through Hong Kong’s central business district each night, as police attempt to contain and repel them. The students are protesting recent moves by Beijing to limit Hong Kong’s ability to hold independent elections.

“Once, I felt I was the luckiest person in the world, because I could fulfill two of my childhood dreams at the same time,” wrote Arnold Wai, a member of Hong Kong’s auxiliary police force, on Facebook, on the evening of Sept. 28. “Before, I was very proud when I personally brought criminals to justice,” he said.

“However, I just phoned my superior tonight, quitting this job. I don’t want to be a political tool for someone,” he wrote, in a post on Facebook that was widely shared among Hong Kong Internet users

[…]

upworthy:

Desperate Plea From Hong Kong Citizen: It’s Time To Give A F***, People

Chaos erupted earlier in Hong Kong after police used tear gas on peaceful, pro-Democracy activists (as well as CNN Hong Kong’s crew of reporters). The young girl in the video below calls for help, saying that the only thing Hong Kong’s activists want is a “pop vote,” a democratic election.

micdotcom:

Censorship chart shows how terrified China’s government is right now
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micdotcom:

Censorship chart shows how terrified China’s government is right now

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A Real Look Into The Hong Kong Umbrella Revolution.

lanitao:

I’ve had so many concerned friends from around the world recently message me, concerned for my safety in Hong Kong. This post is to show my dear friends, and those from around the world what its actually like here in Hong Kong at this moment.

Background:

For anyone that doesnt understand what…

aljazeeraamerica:

Hong Kong’s people want full decolonization

FULL GALLERY

micdotcom:

Hong Kong protesters are using one ingenious app to organize themselves

How do protesters stay in contact with each other when the government has shut down or censored Internet and mobile networks? Simple: You don’t use either.

Meet Open Garden’s FireChat, the messenger app protesters in Hong Kong have been using to circumvent government attempts to prevent them from organizing by blocking social networks like Instagram. Instead of relying on a single website or government-controlled networks, FireChat uses a technology called mesh networking for its “Nearby” chat mode. 

Here’s what it looks like in action | Follow micdotcom 

anitathefreak:

Read the full article click Here !

Things that could only happen in a Hong Kong protest

stereoculturesociety:

CultureHISTORY: "Hands Up, Don’t Shoot" - Hong Kong Protests

The passionate voices of Black America have been heard around the world. Incredible protests in tribute and solidarity as Hong Kong’s youth fights for political autonomy from China.

More on the Hong Kong protests here and more on the power of the “Don’t Shoot” movement here.